DGM Network

Since 1987 taking the danger out of dangerous goods

Blog

The IMDG Code defines “segregation” as the process of separating two or more substances or articles which are considered mutually incompatible wen their packing or stowage together may result in undue hazards in case of leakage, spillage or any other accident. Segregation is obtained by maintaining certain distances between incompatible dangerous goods, by requiring the presence of one or more steel bulkheads or decks between them, or a combination of the previous methods.

Amendment 39-18 of the IMDG has updated once again the segregation provisions for the safe maritime transport of dangerous goods. The information is now displayed in a more comprehensible way, especially regarding segregation groups, and some provisions have been updated to better reflect our knowledge of how dangerous goods might dangerously interact with each other.  

The upcoming new edition of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations (DGR) has introduced segregation provisions for certain packages containing lithium batteries. This has been a result of our better understanding of the risks posed by one of the most common dangerous goods that are shipped worldwide. While some of these provisions will come into effect immediately together with the rest of the new provisions on January 1st, 2018, for others a transitional period has been devised.

New segregation provisions for lithium batteries

 

For the first time in DGM’s history, this year our World Meeting took place in India! From September 2nd to 4th delegates from DGM companies spread over all the continents gathered in Goa for three days of meetings, brainstorming and exchanging ideas.

WM2016 blog 01

 

As dangerous goods experts, we often talk about the necessity to prevent the risks that might occur during normal conditions of transport. Unfortunately, these are not our only concerns: in the world we live in we must also pay attention to potential risks posed by the theft and misuse of the most hazardous goods by ill-intentioned individuals against people, property or the environment. These are known as High Consequence Dangerous Goods, and their threats are addressed by the implementation of Security Plans.

High Consequence Dangerous Goods

 

As technology advances, the way business is made changes as well. In the case of dangerous goods documentation, electronic-based alternatives are being introduced for the traditional paper documents used for air shipments, most notably the Air Waybill. Will electronic data techniques completely replace the use of paper? What are the potential benefits for operators and users?

AWB-electronic

 

Paint and printing ink related material shipments are fairly common. Usually, dangerous goods of a similar nature will be present in the same consignment. Under certain circumstances, the dangerous goods regulations allow the use of a single proper shipping name in order to simplify the documentation and marking processes.

Paint

 

FaLang translation system by Faboba