DGM Network

Since 1987 taking the danger out of dangerous goods

Legal updates

The IMDG Code defines “segregation” as the process of separating two or more substances or articles which are considered mutually incompatible wen their packing or stowage together may result in undue hazards in case of leakage, spillage or any other accident. Segregation is obtained by maintaining certain distances between incompatible dangerous goods, by requiring the presence of one or more steel bulkheads or decks between them, or a combination of the previous methods.

Amendment 39-18 of the IMDG has updated once again the segregation provisions for the safe maritime transport of dangerous goods. The information is now displayed in a more comprehensible way, especially regarding segregation groups, and some provisions have been updated to better reflect our knowledge of how dangerous goods might dangerously interact with each other.  

The upcoming new edition of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations (DGR) has introduced segregation provisions for certain packages containing lithium batteries. This has been a result of our better understanding of the risks posed by one of the most common dangerous goods that are shipped worldwide. While some of these provisions will come into effect immediately together with the rest of the new provisions on January 1st, 2018, for others a transitional period has been devised.

New segregation provisions for lithium batteries

 

Every January a new edition of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations arrives. As usual, we will take a look at the most relevant changes and additions made to the basic regulation for the transportation of dangerous goods by air, which come into effect on January 1st, 2017.

IATA 58th

 

As technology advances and new types of dangerous goods are shipped, the measures that must be taken to prevent risks evolve, and so do the regulations. That is why, for example, the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations (DGR) are updated every year.

However, sometimes some measures cannot wait until next January to be applied. This is the case of the recent restrictions approved by the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) on certain lithium batteries shipments. The risks of lithium batteries catching fire during transport cannot be ignored and several provisions have been modified to exercise a greater degree of caution. New addenda have been published in order to add these changes, which come into effect on April 1st 2016, to the ICAO's Technical Instructions and the IATA DGR.

Regulatory changes for lithium batteries air shipments (April 2016)

 


On January 1st, 2016 a new edition of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations will come into effect. Some of the most significant changes were discussed in a previous blog entry. This article will pick up where we left off and showcase more of the differences between the 57th edition and previous versions (including some transitional provisions that will come to an end with the arrival of the New Year).

 DGR 57

 

The 57th edition of the IATA Dangerous Goods Regulations (DGR) will incorporate the new amendments made by the Dangerous Goods Board. These changes will come into effect as of January 1st 2016. Some of the changes have already been discussed and approved at the IATA Dangerous Goods Board's meetings and are therefore expected to appear on the 57th edition of the DGR; this article will guide you through them.

DGR 2016

  

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